6 Things NOT To Say When Talking to a Designer About Logo Design

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kelsey

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Wherever I go I find myself looking at companies, their logos and what they are telling me about their brand, story and services. Some of the best logos tell you everything in one simple image or word. Or even better, an image IN a word…like a hidden gem! Companies like Amazon, FedEx, Under Armour and BMO Harris are all great examples of this.

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While these logos are ultra-creative and fun, keep in mind that it has to make sense for your company to do this. You want your logo to tell who you are or what you are at first glance. You want to sum up your ideas, services, values and style all in one picture or image.

All of this considered, it’s clear to see that a logo is a BIG deal, as well as a big undertaking for any graphic designer. So it’s probably clear that, “Just come up with a few quick logos” is not something a designer should be doing at all.

To reduce stress, and make the design process as efficient and enjoyable as possible for everyone, below are a few more pointers on what NOT to say while working with a graphic designer to create or refresh a logo.

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Thank you? While graphic designers take solace in this short sentence, it doesn’t give us direction. I trust myself too, but I have my own set of likes/dislikes, color schemes and themes I personally like to use that could be the polar opposite of what you are thinking of for your company.

The best process I have discovered so far is the client brings in samples of what they like in a logo, website and brand. That way there is a visual concept from the beginning that can be talked through by both parties, allowing me to give you what you want on the 1st or 2nd try, rather than the 15th.

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While this may not be at the forefront of your thought process when concepting a new brand or logo, it is important for me to know who you are targeting. The more detail about your audience, the better for me to understand the focus and direction we need to move in.

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That they do. As I mentioned in my last blog post, typography choices are pretty paramount when it comes to branding and saying who you are as a company. Selecting that significant and specific font also allows you to specify in your branding guidelines what font you want others to use when talking about your company, keeping things consistent. Fonts can also determine how someone reads the message. Sometimes being a matter of life and death…

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…fonts matter.

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Logos and fonts are two different things. A font can be used to create a logo, but they are not interchangeable. This type of logo would be considered a “logotype”. If a brand or logo is just typeset or the name of the company, that is a logotype. If it is a stand-alone image with no text, then it’s a “logomark”. See our capture logo below as an example.

 

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So, to answer the question, yes I can, as long as you understand the difference between a logo and font.

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Another vital piece of a logo is color choice. I have found the color selection process easier if the client brings in samples of colors they like or are thinking about using in their brand. If you say, “I really like the green you picked, but can you make it a little greener?”, here’s what’s running through my mind, “Lime green?, kelly green?, spring green?, clover?, fern?, flora?”… The options are endless! More specifics and examples are helpful.

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Image Source: Buzzfeed

 

 

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This is not a drill. I have had plenty of real-life experiences like this and it is painful, to say the least. After the logo process is all said and done, I implore you, get a vector version of said logo, in addition to a .jpg, .png, .eps, .ai/.psd, and pdf file types. As a designer, I will always provide our clients with each version to ensure they’re able to provide the best version of their new logo when needed.

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I really do! As a designer, I want to do everything I can for our clients… Even strive for perfection for you. That’s why I wanted to share this list with you. When you work with a designer, whether it’s with me or someone else, I want that experience to be as amazing, seamless and enjoyable as possible. I hope this list was not only helpful, but also educational and fun. Let me know if you have any questions. I’m here for you!

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